Fitness: The Must-Try Home Workout Programs in 2023

For those who need the convenience and flexibility of virtual fitness services.

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When the pandemic hit and gyms closed, virtual fitness programs were the only game in town. However, as it seemed, people had been practicing in front of a screen since the early 1950s when Jack LaLanne started his first class on television. Thirty years later we appeared on VHS tape and sweated alongside celebrities like Jane Fonda and Richard Simmons. Fast-forward to 2020 and a whole new generation of exercisers are starting to sweat over Zoom, with the American College of Sports Medicine naming virtual fitness programming as the top fitness trend of 2021.

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By 2023, it had fallen to No. 21 on ACSM’s annual list of fitness trends.

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For most exercisers, at-home workouts will prove clinching, but it’s hard to replicate the power of a personal group exercise class on screen. However, despite the added incentive to work out in a group, there’s something to be said for the convenience and programming flexibility that most virtual fitness services have. You can work out when you want, for as long as you want, and choose which class you want. You can even choose the playlist that matches your mood. There is no time to travel or scheduling your life around your favorite class or teacher. Instead, you can take a workout in an on-demand class that fits into your schedule, whether it’s a 30-minute class before work or a 20-minute yoga class when the kids go to bed.

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The cutting-edge production values ​​of most virtual fitness services have come a long way since the early days of the pandemic, bringing the experience as close to an in-person class as possible. Great music and a great trainer are integral to a great workout, and there are plenty of fitness streaming services that offer both. For just a few dollars a month, you can take advantage of the best features of virtual fitness software while still maintaining an active membership in your local fitness club – the best of both worlds. Here are some suggestions for fitness streaming services that offer a first-class experience without breaking the bank. They all have free trials, so go ahead and try them all out before choosing the one you like the most.

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Apple Fitness +

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Apple’s fitness streaming service has all the elements of great virtual workout programming; A diverse and engaging team of trainers, a diverse music catalog, plenty of options when it comes to type, length, and intensity of workouts, and high production values. But what I like most about Apple Fitness+ is that it’s as good a companion at the local gym as it is at home. I can go from a 20-minute workout on the treadmill to 20 minutes on the bike and finish with 20 minutes on the rower—all led by a coach who puts me through my paces.

At home, yoga, high-intensity exercise, Pilates, and dance all require limited equipment, which makes it easy to work out when getting to the gym isn’t in order. I also regularly follow the Time to Walk podcast series which features a new high profile guest every week sharing stories and music when out for a walk. You may also be interested in their structured workout series designed for beginners, seniors, prenatal and postpartum women, get ready for downhill skiing, and yoga for runners.

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$12.99 per month / $99.99 per year

peloton

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Peloton’s suite of fitness classes has everything you need on a streaming service, including the ability to stack workouts to create a full-body experience from warm-ups, cardio, strength, mobility, and cool-downs. Another great feature is the ability to check out a class plan that outlines your workout structure. It even provides a rating and difficulty scale based on feedback from other exercisers.

But the selling point of Peloton’s virtual fitness offerings are their trainers. High energy, super personable and not afraid to have fun, the trainers keep you engaged. However, they can bring more diversity to their team in terms of age, body shape, and size.

It should also be noted that you don’t need a peloton bike or treadmill to enjoy aerobic exercise. There are plenty of exercises that require nothing more than a mat and weights. They even have a series of outdoor audio workouts for runners and walkers.

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$16.99 per month

Lululemon Studio

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Lululemon Studio has instructors and varies in class length and intensity that are key to a good virtual fitness service, but what sets it apart is the partnership with other streaming services, which allows you to try out other great fitness brands like DogPound, Army, Pure Barre and Rumble. Originally designed to run on The Mirror, sold exclusively by Lululemon, Virtual Classroom translates perfectly to your device or TV.

Also of note are chair exercises (strength, cardio, dance, and meditation), which are great options for anyone with mobility issues and are the only default of the four virtual services listed here to include seated exercises.

$39.00 per month (includes up to 6 profiles)

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Nike training

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Like other virtual fitness services, Nike Training lets you choose the type and duration of your workout, but unlike other services, there is no monthly fee. However, despite the no-fee policy, it does not appear as a low-cost option. There are plenty of traditional workouts (strength, cardio, HIIT, yoga) to choose from, including a series of workouts designed for parents to do for their kids and a surprisingly large catalog of pregnancy and postpartum exercises — which is great. Having said that, you don’t get to choose the music or the trainer, which for a lot of people isn’t a deal-breaker since it’s free.

You can customize your workout plans, sync them to your Apple Watch, and earn achievement badges, all features available on paid services. So if price point is an issue, the Nike Training app is a great option.

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