NBA

More than you’d ever want to know about the 2022 Washington Wizards Summer League

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The Wizards came out of the 2022 NBA Summer League with a 3-2 record, a positive scoring differential and one of the three most productive players in Las Vegas, and it was still all underwhelming.

People-facing team leaders will work with strategic communications consultant Alfred E. Neumann so they can recite the usual platitudes, like…

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  • It’s only the summer league.
  • {Player Name} only has {say correct age}
  • What worries me?

The team’s overall performance was good. As you’ll see from the numbers below, several players performed well, and at least somehow made the case that they deserved a training camp invite. This feeling of disappointment stems from the fact that none of the guys who played well were the ones crew hoped to perform. These guys stank.

Matt Modderno, host of the Bleav in Wizards podcast, joined me on the #SoWizards podcast to break down Washington’s summer league and discuss what it means. Listen here, below, or wherever you get your podcasts.

Additionally, Matt and I spoke on his podcast about whether the Wizards’ target player archetypes in the draft are actually valuable in today’s NBA. Listen here, below, or wherever you get your podcasts.

To the data of the summer league…

  • pat spencer — an all-time great lacrosse player who liked basketball best and decided to try to make the NBA — was Washington’s top player and Las Vegas’ third most productive player (minimum 100 possessions). The only player in the Summer League to average a triple-double per 100 team possessions? Spencer (23.2 points, 13.4 rebounds, 14.3 assists). He’s already 26, he doesn’t exactly go after defense, and his low status in the league means he’ll probably never make it. But as I said on my #SoWizards podcast, he’s someone I could see having a Jeremy Lin-esque frenzy for a few weeks if a team is desperate enough to give him minutes.
  • Jordan Bonwin – A good athlete, a good guy and a good defender, who might have just enough offensive play to crack an NBA roster.
  • quenton jackson – Lightning fast with a high drive, Jackson delivered defensive effort, produced a ton of steals (5.3 per 100 possessions) and led the team to victory in their final league game been with a spectacular frenzy in the fourth quarter.

Every year someone has a good summer league that doesn’t make sense. To be fair, Spencer, Goodwin, and Jackson can fall into this category, along with these guys:

  • Vernon Carey Jr. – Carey lost weight and seemed a little lighter on his feet and faster on the floor. And he has been productive – 28.5 points and 16.4 rebounds per 100 possessions. What he’s done – post-ups, hooks and lobs – isn’t the kind of thing that works for a 6-9 year old guy who lacks elite athleticism.
  • Jaime Echenique — Big, productive (24.8 points and 15.9 rebounds per 100 possessions … as well as 9.9 fouls per 100) and slow. It’s easy to imagine Echenique hitting someone like Felton Spencer in the 1990s. It’s much harder to see how everything that made him effective in the summer league translates to NBA games of regular season.
  • Tahjere McCall — Made shots and played defense. He’s likely to be in the G League or playing abroad next season.
  • Isaiah Todd –The Wizards said they used the summer league to “introduce” Todd. He was their second-least productive player (with at least 100 possessions) – an offensive rating of 80 (21 points per 100 possessions below summer league average; 29.4 points per 100 below average of the Wizards’ summer league). At 6-10, he produced just 6.6 rebounds per 100 team possessions. He had 1 assist in 121 minutes leading the team… and 6 turnovers. His strength is said to be shooting, and he’s only hit 43.8 percent on two, 30.3 percent on three, and 50.0 percent on free throws. The ‘but he’s only 20’ argument doesn’t go that far – the summer league’s most productive player (by my PPP metric) was Jabari Walker, a 19-year-old who was the 57th pick of the draft.
  • Johnny Davis – About as complete a debacle as a player could have in the summer league. He shot poorly (27.8% from two, 33.3% from three), had more turnovers than assists and looked physically out of depth (just 1 steal and no blocks in 74 minutes, just 6 trips on the FT line and a whopping 5.7 fouls per 100 team possessions).

Jordan Schakel, the two-way holdover from last season, looked good despite shooting average (for him) at three. On the plus side, his impersonation of Stephen Curry’s mannerisms is superb. Now, if he could do more imitation of Curry’s game…

Here are some numbers from the summer league. “Standard” statistics are for 100 team possessions.

PPA stands for Player Production Average, which is my overall performance metric. The PPA is designed to reward players for the things they do that contribute to winning (scoring, rebounding, making play and defending) while hitting them for the things that don’t (missed shots, turnovers, foul and bad defense) – each in an appropriate proportion.

The PPA number is for the summer league only and is not a prediction of a player’s performance in regular season NBA games.

Washington Wizards 2022 Summer League Stats

PLAYER GMS MPG ORTG USG PLS REC AST STL noir TOV APP
PLAYER GMS MPG ORTG USG PLS REC AST STL noir TOV APP
pat spencer 4 13.1 149 19.8% 23.2 13.4 14.3 4.5 0.0 0.9 339
Tahjere McCall 4 15.6 158 13.8% 24.1 6.8 3.0 3.0 1.5 0.8 230
Vernon Carey, Jr. 3 18.0 110 24.6% 28.5 16.4 0.9 0.9 3.5 3.5 213
Jordan Bonwin 5 17.5 108 24.4% 26.2 11.7 5.3 3.7 0.5 3.2 205
quenton jackson 4 13.2 131 21.9% 32.8 2.7 2.7 5.3 0.0 3.5 191
Tyler Hall 3 16.1 144 16.5% 28.0 4.8 2.9 0.0 0.0 1.0 184
Jaime Echenique 5 18.8 109 24.6% 24.8 15.9 2.0 1.0 2.5 4.0 163
Jordan Schakel 5 19.3 117 23.5% 30.6 7.8 2.9 1.9 1.5 2.9 156
Davion Mintz 3 10.4 118 14.7% 19.4 0.0 3.0 3.0 0.0 3.0 95
Craig Sword 5 11.7 127 10.3% 12.7 4.0 3.2 1.6 3.2 3.2 61
Pierria Henry 4 14.7 107 14.1% 8.0 5.6 12.0 2.4 0.0 5.6 39
Devon Dotson 4 19.2 103 22.6% 20.1 8.5 10.4 0.6 1.2 3.0 33
Isaiah Todd 5 24.1 80 17.6% 17.4 6.6 0.4 0.4 1.2 2.3 1
Arthur Zagars 4 7.9 81 11.7% 10.3 1.5 3.0 1.5 0.0 4.4 -29
Johnny Davis 3 24.8 76 20.4% 15.7 8.2 3.1 0.6 0.0 5.0 -42

Minimum 100 possessions played. Statistics are provided for 100 team possessions.

Points

  1. Moses Moody, GSW — 41.5
  2. RAdm Thomas, BRK—40.1
  3. Trey Murphy III, NOP 39.6
  4. Benoît Mathurin, IND — 39.3
  5. Moses Wright, DAL — 36.9

Wizard Leader: Quenton Jackson — 32.8

Bounces

  1. Kofi Cockburn, UTA — 23.8
  2. Tyrique Jones, NOP — 23.3
  3. Darius Days, SAS — 21.1
  4. Jared Uthoff, GSW—21.1
  5. Trevion Williams, BOS—20.6

Wizard Leader: Vernon Carey Jr. — 16.4

Aids

  1. Pat Spencer, WAS — 14.3
  2. Charlie Moore, DET—14.0
  3. James Akinjo, ATL — 13.5
  4. Josh Giddey, OKC—13.3
  5. Zavier Simpson, ENT — 13.0

Fly

  1. Ashton Hagans, CLE — 6.4
  2. Dr. Smith, MIA — 6.3
  3. Tommy Kuhse, ENT — 6.1
  4. Saben Lee, DET—5.7
  5. Quenton Jackson, WAS — 5.3

Blocks

  1. Isaiah Jackson, IND — 6.9
  2. Kyle Alexander, POR — 5.1
  3. Neemias Queta, CAS — 5.0
  4. Nick Richards, CHO — 5.0
  5. Gabriel Chachashviili, GSW — 5.0

Wizard Leader: Vernon Carey Jr. — 3.5

Turnover

  1. Nick Richards, CHO—9.0
  2. Justin Robinson, UTA — 8.8
  3. Trevelin Queen, PHI — 8.8
  4. Ziaire Williams, MEM — 8.7
  5. Josh Giddey, OKC—8.3

“Leader” of Wizards: Pierria Henry — 5.6

faults

  1. Alpha Kaba, ATL—14.4
  2. Reggie Perry, BAC — 12.8
  3. Marcus Bingham Jr. — 12.1
  4. Vitto Brown, LAL — 11.8
  5. Maker from Makur, CHI — 10.6

“Leader” of Sorcerers: Craig Sword — 10.4

Three-point field goal percentage

Minimum of 15 attempts

  1. Isaiah Joe, PSI — 60.0%
  2. Keon Ellis, CAS — 54.2%
  3. Matt Ryan, BOS—52.6%
  4. Brodric Thomas, BOS — 52.2%
  5. Cole Swider, LAL — 50.0%

Wizard Leader: Tyler Hall — 44.4%

If you’re interested in something you don’t see here, let me know in the comments.

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