GOLF

Trump knew exactly what he was doing by hosting a Saudi Arabia Golf League event

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We’re back to that nonsense again. Saudi Arabia is getting a makeover after it sparked global anger for the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist who was not a friend of the royal family. The reaction to his murder was intense, in part because Donald Trump was president. Remember, Trump was blamed for all the bad news in the world. Khashoggi died in 2018, but now people remember his name because Joe Biden went to Saudi Arabia and crawled for more oil after declaring them pariahs. Second, the nation is at the helm of a new golf league that is attracting serious talent from the PGA Tour.

LIV Golf saw the birth of what could be described as free agency in golf. Hundreds of millions of dollars have gone to players like Phil Mickelson, Dustin Johnson, Bryson DeChambeau, the Koepka brothers and Sergio Garcia, enticing them to jump ship PGA. It worked. DeChambeau and Johnson were both reportedly paid $125 million to join LIV. Tiger Woods’ offer was around $700-800 million. The league’s 2023 season has 14 events with $405 million in prize money. Over the weekend, Donald Trump hosted a LIV event at his class in Bedminster, New Jersey. Of course, the liberal media were upset that this could be the start of a Saudi “image rehabilitation” (via NBC News):

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Former President Donald Trump’s comments casting doubt on Saudi Arabia’s involvement in the 9/11 terror attacks mark the latest in a string of recent public relations victories for the desert kingdom and its Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Four years after he was accused of ordering the murder of prominent Saudi critic and Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the crown prince has been welcomed to two European capitals and a Saudi-funded golf tournament kicked off this weekend at Trump’s Bedminster Golf Club.

[…]

Rehabilitating Salman will encourage other autocrats to ignore human rights, campaigners say.

“He succeeded, he really succeeded in repairing relations with the West after Khashoggi,” said Ali Adubisi, Berlin-based director of the European Saudi Organization for Human Rights. “These Western leaders are not responsible for human rights. They have their own priorities. And the message for civil society? Do not trust these leaders.

Besides oil, Saudi Arabia is also a major arms buyer and a potential source of multi-billion dollar construction contracts to achieve Salman’s “2030 Vision” for his country’s development.

This week, social media was abuzz with outlandish images of a planned 106-mile mirror building in the Saudi desert, part of the crown prince’s plan for a futuristic new city called “Neom”.

As Salman also enjoyed positive headlines this week over his outlandish plans for a futuristic megacity, activists and pundits warned that Saudi Arabia’s efforts to improve its global standing were working despite scant evidence of a change in his approach to human rights, fueling accusations of Western hypocrisy and undermining calls for reforms in the region.

We do not care? The world does not stop doing business as usual because the Crown Prince allegedly ordered Khashoggi to be cut to pieces at their consulate in Istanbul, Turkey. So why is the liberal media shocked that Saudi Arabia continues to struggle with a mixed human rights record? This development is not shocking since the Saudis have been terrible on these fronts for generations. From Earth to liberal America, Saudi Arabia will never become California in any aspect. They are not politically awake and never will be. Just accept the reality that they are our best undemocratic partner in the Middle East. It’s not the best on the list, but that’s what we need to work on in the region. We’re not going to blow this all up for a dead reporter.

Moreover, Donald Trump has kept his name in the news. His 2022 endorsements record is solid, and he’s ready to announce his 2024 run. He also knows the media hates his appearance of palling with autocrats, so it was troll bait to host the LIV event. It was also about giving the fledgling new league a pristine and elite course to start its new venture.

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