NBA

Wizards close summer league with 87-77 win over Golden State Warriors

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As predicted on draft night, the Wizards’ best player was Pat Spencer, and the former lacrosse star helped the team to a dominating fourth quarter and a comfortable 87-77 win over the Golden State Warriors.

Several times tonight, it looked like the Warriors would beat the Wizards by double digits. Then they opened the final period with a “who is that?” lineup so obscure, I turned to my wife and said, “Wizards are about to go on the loose.” And they did, opening the fourth in a 20-0 frenzy.

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  • pat spencer is a long way from reaching the NBA, but during the summer league he showed solid skills and enough athleticism to warrant further scrutiny. Tonight: 11 points, 5 rebounds, 7 assists and 2 steals in 24 minutes.
  • In the fourth quarter, Quenton Jackson scored 14 points on 6-8 shooting (including a three), and also produced 3 rebounds, an assist and 2 steals. He’s fast, competitive and big enough for a reserve winger role. The Wizards may not invite him to training camp, but he’s flashed enough in the summer league to warrant a peek somewhere.
  • Jaime Echenique was an inside load, which was enough for the summer league. Tonight: 17 points, 12 rebounds and enough defensive presence to make things tough for the Warriors.
  • Devon Dotson is small but flashed the game which caught the interest of wizards.
  • Mac McClung isn’t on the wizard list, but he’s fast and quite strong, and he had great chemistry with James Wiseman. If the Warriors don’t bring him to training camp, an NBA team will.
  • Isaiah Todd poorly played, again. Anyone can have a bad shooting night (he was 3-13 rushing and 2-8 3-pointers), but he’s 6-10 and had 1 rebound and zero assists in 23 minutes. He’s fought guys like Lester Quinones and Dustin Sleva.
  • Arthur Zagars joined the Billions Club. I don’t remember which player “invented” it, but the idea is that a guy plays so many minutes without producing anything. Tonight Zagars got 5 minutes and produced no rebounds, assists, steals, blocks, turnovers, personal fouls and points.

Thus ends a vaguely disappointing Wizards summer league. The team went to Las Vegas hoping that guys like Todd, Johnny Davis and perhaps one or two more guys would show progress and at least flashes of future rotation players. Todd looked horrible most of the time. Davis seemed overwhelmed.

Vernon Carey Jr. has been productive, but in a way that seems unlikely he will be able to replicate at the NBA level. It was pretty much the same for Echenique.

Below are the four factors that decide who wins and loses in basketball – shooting (efg), rebounding (offensive rebounds), ball handling (turnovers), foul (free throws made).

I simplified them a bit. Although factors are usually presented as percentages, this is most useful over a full season. In a single game, the raw numbers for each category are easier to understand.

Four factors: Wizards 87 vs. Warriors 77

FOUR FACTORS WIZARDS WARRIORS
FOUR FACTORS WIZARDS WARRIORS
GFE 0.454 0.479
OREB seven 12
TOV 11 21
MTF 18 8
RHYTHM 103
ORTG 101 89

Below are some performance metrics, including the Average Player Production Game Score (PPA) (very similar to what I used to call the Dashboard Impact Score). PPA is my overall production metric, crediting players for the things they do that help a team win (scoring, rebounding, playing, defending) and hitting them for the things that hurt (missed shots, turnovers, poor defense, fouls).

Game Score (GmSC) converts individual production into points on the scoreboard. The scale is the same as the points scale and reflects the value of each player. total contributions for the game. The lowest possible GmSC is zero.

PPA is a per possession metric designed for larger data sets. In small samples, the numbers can get weird. But some readers prefer it, so I’m also including PPP scores. Reminder: in PPP, 100 is average, higher is better, and override level is 45. For a single game, override level isn’t very useful, and I reiterate caution about small samples producing results strange.

POSS is the number of possessions each player had on the floor in this game.

PTS = points scored

ORTG = Offensive Rating, which is RBIs per individual possession x 100. RBIs are not the same as runs scored. He understands the value of assists and offensive rebounds, as well as splitting the credit when receiving an assist.

USG = offensive usage rate. The average is 20%.

ORTG and USG are stat versions created by Wizards assistant coach Dean Oliver and modified by me. ORTG is a measure of efficiency that takes into account the value of shots, offensive rebounds, assists and turnovers. USG includes shooting from the floor and free throw line, offensive rebounds, assists and turnovers.

Key stats: Assistants

WIZARDS MIN POSSIBLE PLS ORTG USG APP GmSC +/-
WIZARDS MIN POSSIBLE PLS ORTG USG APP GmSC +/-
pat spencer 24 51 11 130 21.0% 263 26.4 16
quenton jackson 22 48 18 108 27.9% 247 23.2 15
Jaime Echenique 30 64 17 122 21.7% 142 17.9 25
Devon Dotson 16 35 11 144 25.5% 242 16.9 -6
Tyler Hall 21 45 seven 92 16.3% 73 6.5 16
Craig Sword 14 31 5 74 21.8% 44 2.7 13
Jordan Schakel 17 37 6 105 13.1% 32 2.4 -ten
Tahjere McCall 8 16 2 97 9.3% 52 1.7 -8
Jordan Bonwin 20 42 2 59 18.1% 4 0.3 -1
Arthur Zagars 5 11 0 0.0% 0 0.0 -4
Isaiah Todd 23 50 8 54 21.8% -102 0.0 -6

Key Stats: Warriors

WARRIORS MIN POSSIBLE PLS ORTG USG APP GmSC +/-
WARRIORS MIN POSSIBLE PLS ORTG USG APP GmSC +/-
Mac McClung 23 49 14 138 23.6% 201 19.6 3
Jarrod Uthoff 9 19 seven 179 15.5% 324 12.2 2
Payton Willis 22 46 seven 129 10.4% 131 12.0 -3
Lester Quinone 20 43 13 105 21.9% 93 7.9 6
Alex Moraux 21 45 ten 84 26.5% 57 5.1 -1
Gabriel Chachashvili 17 37 3 83 7.5% 69 5.0 12
Dustin Sleva 11 25 2 123 9.1% 91 4.4 -3
James Wiseman 19 41 11 85 33.7% -4 0.0 -seven
Selom Mawugbe 4 9 0 0 11.1% -164 0.0 -15
Kalob Ledoux 19 40 5 63 17.4% -73 0.0 -23
Yudai Baba 19 42 2 52 21.0% -72 0.0 0
Joel Ntambwe seven 14 0 19 22.2% -264 0.0 -11
J.D. Notes ten 21 3 52 31.7% -241 0.0 -ten

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